Respect the Ground You Walk On

Like so many others, I remember exactly what I was doing when I first heard about the attacks of September 11, 2001.  I was in ninth grade & heard my older brothers talking about some kind of plane crash as I got ready for school.  At that point, it wasn’t clear what was actually happening & I remember one of them saying they thought it was an accident.  I went to school not realizing how serious the situation was.  When I got there, they had all the TVs in the school turned on. As I hung out with my friends before school started, I remember standing in the common area, all staring at the TV that hung there watching the towers smoke & finally realizing how serious of a situation it was.  It was during my first period English class that we watched live as the first tower fell. I remember how quiet it was as we all sat there in shock & my teacher quietly walked over to the TV and turned it off before we had the chance to watch anything else. We then spent the rest of the day, wandering from class to class, our poor teachers trying to help us stay calm & understand.  Of course, I came home & as a family we tried to understand it as well, along with the rest of the country & world. I cried many times that day & in the following weeks. I’ve cried many times since when I think of the lives lost to the senseless act of terrorism. I feel it deep in my heart the importance of remembering what happened & the people we lost.

9/11 Memorial – New York City

Consequently, when we had the chance to visit New York City many years later, we made it a priority to visit the 9/11 Memorial & Museum. For me, it felt like a token of respect. I could not in good conscious go to New York City & not visit.  I felt the same way when I visited the island of Oahu. I felt compelled to visit Pearl Harbor for the same reason.  There are just certain places that though they are the sites of tragedies, they have since been turned into beautiful memorials that we are then allowed to visit.  Historic sites in general, whether they be memorials, battlefields, burial grounds, churches, etc., can be some of the best places to visit as a traveler. The history of the world is held in those special places & I believe it is a good & important thing for all of us to visit, learn, show our respect & remember. So how do we do that?

Since we often visit these places of importance while on vacation, it’s easy to let the levity of being on vacation overshadow the fact that we are often, walking on sacred ground.  Below you’ll find a few tips for how to enjoy your experience at these important places, but also show respect to the events that happened there.

First, talk about where you’re going in advance. Whether you’re traveling as a family & have kids, or you’re doing a getaway with adult friends, I would encourage you to talk with everyone about these important sites before you go there. Talk about where you are going & why it is important. Everyone has a different perspective & understanding of the world & just because I may understand the importance of a site, that doesn’t mean the people I’m traveling with do. Or maybe none of us understand why a site is important, but we know everyone visits there for some reason. Do some basic research & talk about what happened at these sites before you get there. This allows everyone to put a site in context & in my opinion, you’ll then arrive with a sense of respect that will help everyone govern their behavior in a positive & respectful way.  

USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor

Second, be respectful of posted placards.  This may seem obvious, but there have been many times I’ve visited a memorial & even though there is a sign that says, “Please stay off the memorial,” some kid is being allowed to play on it.  Or we go into a church & they have it posted, “Please, no pictures,” and someone is going around taking pictures of everything. I saw this very thing happen when we were visiting Westminster Abbey in London. If you haven’t been there, it is a remarkable place with incredible historic value. Part of that comes from the fact that the church is basically a cemetery. There are hundreds of people buried in the floor & in the walls, so you are literally walking over the final resting place of many. They tell you multiple times as you move through the queue to enter that pictures are not allowed once inside. There are posted placards everywhere saying the same thing. Yet, every few minutes we would hear one of the people working there announce, “No pictures, please.” Or you’d see them approach someone and kindly ask them to put their camera away. Sometimes, it’s not about the next great Instagram photo you’re going to get. Sometimes it’s about appreciating where you are & showing the respect a place deserves. The bottom line is, we are guests in the places we visit & it is not for us to determine that our opinions or wants are above what the stewards of those places have deemed appropriate.

Westminster Abbey, London

Lastly, though not required when visiting a site, I recommend using provided audio guides or at least reading available signage about a place. This allows you to slow down, take a breath and learn. Allow yourself some time to briefly dive into the specifics of what makes a place important. It’s not just a building or a statue or a relic. Important things happened in these places. People lived & often died in these places we now visit in our abundance as tourists. They have stories to tell if we will only listen. I have found that when I do this, I am often touched and the feelings I experience give me a greater appreciation for those that came before me & it solidifies in my memory the importance of a place. I firmly believe that everyone can feel the spirit & energy of a place by slowing down enough to learn & appreciate.

There are so many wonderful places in the world to visit.  Some of the best have the hardest pieces of history attached to them. They are worth visiting & we should visit them. We need to be respectful though. At least understand the basics of why a place is important before you arrive so you can gauge your behavior in a respectful manner.  Follow posted placards.  Remember, you are a guest and if the stewards of a place ask that you do something, it is your responsibility to do it.  Finally, learn all you can. It is our duty to remember the past so we do not repeat it. I firmly believe travel is one of the best educators, but it is only through our respect of the places we visit that history can be heard.

Posted on September 11, 2020, in Travel Advice, Travel Advice and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Nice work Alisa. Well written and much needed in general. Love you. Mom

    On Fri, Sep 11, 2020 at 10:39 AM Woodbrey Family Travel Blog wrote:

    > > > > > > > Alisa Woodbrey posted: ” > Like so many others, I remember exactly what I was doing when I first > heard about the attacks of September 11, 2001. I was in ninth grade & > heard my older brothers talking about some kind of plane crash as I got > ready for school. At that point, it ” > > > >

  2. Nice blog post. I have very similar feelings as you about the sanctity of certain places we visit not being respected. I love your picture of the 9/11 Memorial. We love that someone places a white rose on the memorial when it would have been that individual’s birthday. It is truly a humbling place to visit when you take in the gravity of what happened.

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